Learn the art of manipulating data with this serious MATLAB training for only $27


When engineers and mathematicians need to get down to some hardcore computer modeling and data visualization, MATLAB is one of the prime programming languages and environments of choice. Data analysis is one of the fastest growing areas of need in many businesses and MATLAB is at the heart of that analysis. So learn MATLAB from the ground up with this complete mastery bundle of courses. Right now, you can get these five MATLAB courses for only $27 (86 percent off its regular price) from TNW Deals. Across more than 250 lectures and 20-plus hours of instruction, you can go from…

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Tone-deaf cop addresses real-life shooting while playing video games


This week, a Seattle police officer chose to talk about the death of a pregnant woman at the hands of his fellow officers … while livestreaming a video game. On June 18th, officers came to Charleena Lyles‘ home to investigate a burglary she reported. Lyles, a pregnant mother of four, was then killed in a scuffle with the officers. Some of the details of the case are unclear, but it’s known for sure three of her children were home at the time. It’s a deeply upsetting case that has raised troubling questions about the officers’ use of force. One officer recapped…

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I trained a neural network to create CIA malware codenames


The Central Intelligence Agency is America’s best-known intelligence agency, but it’s still shrouded in secrecy. Thanks to Wikileaks, we’ve learned a lot about its internal workings, particularly when it comes to cyber-espionage. One thing that I’ve come to appreciate is the humorous bent to how the CIA names its internal projects. There are some absolute howlers. My favorite is, of course, Gaping hole of DOOM. Other honorable mentions include Munge Payload, McNugget, RoidRage, and Philosoraptor. If you’re curious, TechCrunch has published a near-exhaustive list of them. Pretty imaginative stuff. This got me thinking, neural networks are great at naming things…

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TRVL is the best travel platform you’re not using (yet)


From the moment I saw it, I was instantly enamored with TRVL. The brainchild of Dutch entrepreneur Jochem Wijnands, TRVL is a sort of mashup that turns each user into a travel agent with the potential to earn money for their recommendations. Think of it as TripAdvisor meets Airbnb and Skyscanner. Travelers, Wijnands says, are the best source of information for other travelers. And while the typical tourist spends hours scouring the web for information, TRVL puts all this information at your fingertips by leaving the guesswork to agents. These agents are locals (or highly familiar with a given area)…

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Bethesda is bleeding gamers dry, and I’ve had enough


In case you were lucky enough to miss Bethesda’s tepid showing at E3 2017, blockbuster RPG The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim is getting yet another re-release. This time, it’s coming out, at least in part, in VR. If this were the first, or even the second time that Skyrim has resurfaced, I might not bat an eyelash. But since its release in 2011, it’s been re-released three times: for current gen consoles in 2016, and VR and Nintendo Switch this year. Hey Bethesda? I’d love to see you pack Skyrim away on a trophy shelf somewhere and move on to brighter new projects.…

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It’s time to stop using video playback to measure battery life


When was the last time you bought a laptop  that lasted as long as advertised, especially if its a PC? Probably not any time recently. Problem is, manufacturers continue to insist on using video playback to measure battery life. That is, frankly, nonsensical; video playback is literally one of the most efficient things a modern processor can do, and using it to measure battery life creates wildly unrealistic expectations for the average consumer. In my experience, modern laptops only last 50 to 65 percent of their claimed battery life. For example: I recently reviewed the new Surface Pro, which actually…

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This 3D-printed map from the original Legend of Zelda was worth every penny


The Legend of Zelda was the pinnacle of 1980s console games. Its sprawling levels spanned multiple regions and included desert, wetlands, and tree-lined forests. For the time, it was a massive map and an impressive display of pushing hardware to its limits. Due to the size of the world, it often left nerdy young children, like me, to their own devices in an attempt to map out each of the game’s rooms. Or, perhaps your parents loved you more than mine did (sorry mom and dad), and splurged for a subscription to Nintendo Power, which contained a complete strategy map…

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